A duck and a dream

I had the pleasure of watching arguably the world’s best magician David Copperfield live in Melbourne recently. The magic itself was awesome...

17 reasons you should always carry a book with you

1. As someone who used to spend a lot of time waiting for real estate clients to show up – I know that clients / appointments / people in general are often late...

Reality Television your way to Success

I think I’m one of the only “motivational speakers” (not that I call myself that) who will openly admit that I watch television. I watch bad television too… even… dare I say it… reality television.

Where is the love?!

One of my businesses, Elephant Property, works in the notoriously under appreciated category of residential property management. The old adage in property management...

The power of the word

I’m quite distraught. I was eating my personal trainer approved afternoon snack of 12 almonds (my suggestion of 12 Tim Tams: not approved)...

Thursday, March 20, 2014

The Law of Reciprocity


The Law of Reciprocity is as simple this: do something nice for a decent person, and they'll want to return the favour. 

It's one of my favourite universal laws and I see it in action all the time. 

Nowhere better than this hand written card I received around Valentines day from a local Beauty Salon I've never before patronised.  

The card says "Happy Valentines day Kirsty. The team at Beauty Plus have selected you as one of the hardest working women in Launceston. We wanted to reward you with a free 30 minute massage...."

Instantly. I know this salon. I remember this salon. I feel good will towards them and all they've done so far is compliment me and offer me something that will cost them half an hour of one staff member's time - but could lead to a long term customer (and in this case, one who talks about places she loves a lot). 

Limited cost, big potential payoff. I love it. And the law of reciprocity means I'm unlikely to take them up on their half hour massage offer and spend nothing else with them. It also means that they've wowed me enough that I'll share the story and give them positive word of mouth that way. 

And for the cynics out there who know that I'm unlikely to have been the only person to receive a card for Valentines Day -  you know what, it doesn't matter! Provided they haven't gone overboard and my entire facebook feed is teeming with Launceston's "hardest working women" - the recipient, me in this instance, can still smile and feel special - and let the law of reciprocity do it's thing. 

By Kirsty Dunphey with 2 comments

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Exasperated or Elated the Choice is Yours


"And so I'd email them... and then 2 or 3 days later they'd call me back!" my client exclaimed, exasperated when describing another service experience to me. 

We discussed at length the two key rules for communication (in my opinion). 

Firstly - when a client contacts you - if you can't help them straight away - acknowledge them! A simple email back to say - hi, I got your request and I'm searching for the answer - or I'll be back in touch on XX date - would have been all this client needed. 

And rule 2, clients give you guidance as to how they like to be communicated with when they contact you. If a client emails you, unless they specify otherwise, they probably want an email back. If a client phones you, they probably want to be phoned back. 

Now - this one's a hard one for me. I'm an email junkie. It works for my lifestyle, it's verifiable, it's totally time appropriate for me (meaning I can get a lot of contact done after kids are asleep). BUT - if a client calls me and leaves a message I pick up the phone and call them back. The only exception being if I can't reach them - I won't leave a rambling voice mail message, I'll simply say - I've tried to reach you, I'll email you through all the answers (and on the email I'll say how they can phone me if they'd like to chat). It's a slight compromise - but I've always tried to contact them in their preferred method first. 

So - to recap:

Rule 1 - acknowledge if you can't answer straight away. (And then diarise your next point of contact even if THAT too is to say you haven't got the answer yet, but you haven't forgotten about them).

Rule 2 - communicate with your client in the method they show you they want to be communicated with. 

By Kirsty Dunphey with 3 comments

Thursday, March 6, 2014

The power of the pen


I eagerly ripped open the tiny envelope my husband had placed in my hands. It's not often we get mail sent to our house and it's always a treat to see a pretty hand addressed envelope when I'm pretty sure it contains a card. 

You see, I love cards. I've just sent out a manifesto asking for no presents for my 35th birthday - which rolls around in a few days requesting a hand written card (and listing a few "non-present" alternatives for those who I know won't be satisfied with just a card). 

But back to cards - I love 'em and I'm sure I'm not alone. 

And this card was even more special than most due to it's complete unexpected nature. It was from one of my husband's friends. We've met 3 times in person. Once in Canada (where he lives), once at his wedding and then a few weeks ago when he and his lovely wife stayed with us at our home. 

The card was beautifully written (not unexpected, as this chap has a way with words that lead me to crown his wedding speech "un-toppable") but it was the mere fact that he'd thought to send a card that floored me. 

The card thanked me for lending him my husband (so to speak). They'd been on a boys fishing trip the weekend before and the card said he knew there were extra challenges with me being at home with our two little ones and just how much these sorts of trips meant to him with him living out of the country and just how appreciative he was. Not exactly what you'd expect from a 30-something guy without kids of his own eh? 

This card will be remembered and, you can bet, if my husband is needed on another boy's trip for this thoughtful friend, he'll be handed over willingly. 

One stamp. One piece of cardboard. One envelope. Huge power. What can you do with that arsenal this week? 

By Kirsty Dunphey with 4 comments

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